Tonbridge Lacemakers


Go to content

Show and Tell

Jenny Hughes

Whilst on holliday in Chipping Camden we visited an exhibition at the museum of craft and design at Court Barn. The exhibition depicted nine famous design and crafts people in Chipping Camden and North Cotswolds since 1900.
I was immediately inspired by Katharine Adams (bookbinder). The front cover of one of her books was a very artistic design of an oak tree with gold acorns and oak leaves.
Having lived in the hamlet of Mile Oak for over 40 years it seemed a significant subject to work as a memory of our time living here.

Pam Edwards

I started Milanese lace under Jessica's tuition at Tonbridge Adult Education classes. This is my first motif after a few practice braids. Worked in DMC 50 cotton in white, I particularly like the meander braid. The design is from Pat Read.

Margaret Adams.

I started getting interested in working the 'ladies' after seeing several patterns in a
Honiton book, and period programmes on the television. My first lady was in the
Georgian era and took nine months to work, that was back in 2010. I then worked
a Victorian lady in 2012. Since then I have completed another three ladies.
The thread used was 120 for all the ladies, as recommended.


Pam Edwards.

Lady with Parasol is the "pinnacle" of my Milanese lace making, worked with DMC 50 cotton in ecru, under Roz Snowden's tutorage. A lot of the braids finish and are sewn out at the waistband. To make a neat finish I mounted it on to a piece of fabric ( with a bit of sparkle in it ) and took the threads through to the other side. Mounted into this lovely frame with a bevelled mount, I am very proud of her. Thanks to Pat Read for such a lovely design.





Rosemary Jobling


The bookmark on the right was copied from The Mainly Lace Collection,
I made it with Cotona 30 with a Perle 5 gimp.

The one on the left was from the Lace Guild Book
which I made it with DMC Broder Machine 30.


Laura Emm

Laura worked these adorable pieces whilst she was a junior member of TLM. Encouraged to learn the craft by her Grandmother Anne Bates, who is a founder member of the group.





Anne Bates


This piece of Russian Lace was intended for the centre of my dining room table, so I bought the threads and the book with the pattern in it. However after spending a considerable amount of money on three weekend residential courses to make it, not to mention countless hours of work, I decided I couldn't bear the thought of anyone spilling anything on it, so I had it framed!


Jill Smith

This pattern, Anemone Garter, was purchased from DJ Hornsby of Canterbury's website. When my God-daughter told she was getting married and I decided to make her a garter, I had only been making Tourchon lace for 3 years. 200 hours later!!
It was and amazing journey, made easier with help from my teacher Louise Woodward, and the humour of my class friends, especially during numerous occasions of working backwards. Before completing this piece I had not made anything larger than a 5" square mat and not worked with a gimp thread but the challenge and the end product I think (being modest) was really worth it.



Lacemaking Group based in Tonbridge, Kent | notatudignum@gmail.com

Back to content | Back to main menu